Doctor Who World Tour NYC In Photos

go site I spent the Series 8 premiere in NYC Thursday on the fan side of the barricades. For those of you who haven’t followed us since the early days, we obtained a press pass for the Series 7 premiere.  On Thursday I only used what a fan would have at their disposal for reporting: an iPhone and a notepad. 

e desire site de rencontre

I got to the Ziegfeld at 6:45 am. Only a few people were on the standby line and ticket holder line. Waiting and line and making new friends is an important part of the premiere experience which I missed at the Series 7 premiere. I passed the time hanging out with friends, occasional food and restroom breaks, as well as hanging out with my friends on the line. Quite often BBC staff and other press would stop at the front of the line for interviews and photos.

diclofenaco retard 100mg 1g

baclofen prices walgreens Shortly before the cast arrives, a Cyberman threatens everyone.

dilantin 5mg tabletten

Photographers eager to see Peter Capaldi and Jenna Coleman arrive on the blue carpet. Most of the blue carpet arrival photos were too blurry to post.

Before he joined the press on the blue carpet, Peter Capaldi signed my pass! I should also note my dress is one Clara wears in Deep Breath.

Before the screening starts, Chris Hardwick gestures excitedly while threatening everyone about recording or posting spoilers.

I sat in the front row stage right. Overall Deep Breath was an excellent start to Series 8. There’s more I can say but will hold back until the 23rd. The Q&A session featured topics such as: previous Doctor Who viewings, Capaldi’s casting process, and what fans can expect from Twelve.

The Series 8 World Tour was a very thrilling experience and I can’t wait for the Series 9 premiere! 

Outlander Screen vs. Page Review: Episode 1

For years I was worried that any attempts at moving the Outlander series from the page to the screen was going to undermine the integrity of the story. I am glad last night’s premiere on Starz proved these thoughts wrong. This review and those to follow will focus heavily on comparing the books to the episodes and will contain spoilers for both. [Photo courtesy of Starz]

Claire Randall (Caitriona Baife) is seeking normalcy after the horrors of World War II only to have her life turned upside down again. She has been separated from her husband Frank (played by Tobias Menzies) for five years and their honeymoon in Scotland is their chance to reconnect.  During the trip, Frank investigates his family tree, a pursuit which leaves Claire feeling isolated.These opening scenes in the book are filled with spoken and between the lines tension. Their experiences in the war have changed their personalities and their views on the future.

On screen, although minor details are sacrificed for time or altered, evidence of conflict between Claire and Frank still comes across. Frank becomes so focused on the project that she resorts to seduction to turn the focus back on their relationship. She doesn’t want to become the professor’s wife, but a woman with her own career in medicine. 

Claire’s journey to the 18th century starts with an an odd palm reading and ends with stepping into a stone circle after witnessing a Druid ritual. Claire’s feelings of weightlessness and disorientation were depicted in the episode as similar to a severe car crash. The lack of sci-fi time travel special effects keep the original drama of the scene in the novel without sacrificing visual impact.

The visuals of Highland fighters confronting British soldiers in the woods enhanced the drama of Claire’s entry into the 18th Century. The first person she meets is is the incredibly threatening Black Jack Randall. The decision to have Menzies play both Frank and Black Jack solidifies Claire’s confusion about the past. She has a feeling they are connected but it is a mystery that won’t be solved right away. One of the Highlanders finds Randall and attacks before he can harm Claire. Jamie Fraser (Sam Heughan) is suspicious of Claire but is also concerned Randall will try to harm her again. The Highlanders claim her as a captive as they flee to their stronghold. 

The Outlander pilot overall set the tone for a rare well crafted adaptation of a novel. I am looking forward to seeing how the next episode will portray the people and environment of Castle Leoch.

Outlander Screen vs. Page Review: Episode 1

For years I was worried that any attempts at moving the Outlander series from the page to the screen was going to undermine the integrity of the story. I am glad last night’s premiere on Starz proved these thoughts wrong. This review and those to follow will focus heavily on comparing the books to the episodes and will contain spoilers for both. [Photo courtesy of Starz]

Claire Randall (Caitriona Baife) is seeking normalcy after the horrors of World War II only to have her life turned upside down again. She has been separated from her husband Frank (played by Tobias Menzies) for five years and their honeymoon in Scotland is their chance to reconnect.  During the trip, Frank investigates his family tree, a pursuit which leaves Claire feeling isolated.These opening scenes in the book are filled with spoken and between the lines tension. Their experiences in the war have changed their personalities and their views on the future.

On screen, although minor details are sacrificed for time or altered, evidence of conflict between Claire and Frank still comes across. Frank becomes so focused on the project that she resorts to seduction to turn the focus back on their relationship. She doesn’t want to become the professor’s wife, but a woman with her own career in medicine. 

Claire’s journey to the 18th century starts with an an odd palm reading and ends with stepping into a stone circle after witnessing a Druid ritual. Claire’s feelings of weightlessness and disorientation were depicted in the episode as similar to a severe car crash. The lack of sci-fi time travel special effects keep the original drama of the scene in the novel without sacrificing visual impact.

The visuals of Highland fighters confronting British soldiers in the woods enhanced the drama of Claire’s entry into the 18th Century. The first person she meets is is the incredibly threatening Black Jack Randall. The decision to have Menzies play both Frank and Black Jack solidifies Claire’s confusion about the past. She has a feeling they are connected but it is a mystery that won’t be solved right away. One of the Highlanders finds Randall and attacks before he can harm Claire. Jamie Fraser (Sam Heughan) is suspicious of Claire but is also concerned Randall will try to harm her again. The Highlanders claim her as a captive as they flee to their stronghold. 

The Outlander pilot overall set the tone for a rare well crafted adaptation of a novel. I am looking forward to seeing how the next episode will portray the people and environment of Castle Leoch.

TDHN Exclusive: Five Insights From The Outlander NYC Premiere

Monday night’s screening and Q&A hosted by the 92nd Y was a chance for fans on the East Coast to see what Starz has in store for Outlander. The official premiere is Saturday, August 9th at 9pm.

image

[From left to right: Leslie Yaizel (moderator), Tobias Menzies (Frank Randall/Jonathan “Black Jack” Randall), Sam Heughan (Jamie Fraser), Catriona Baife (Claire Randall), Diana Gabaldon (Outlander series author), Ronald D. Moore (Executive Producer)]

Here’s five insights from the discussion fans will appreciate. As a note, only minor spoilers are included in this article as a courtesy to first time viewers or those who are not caught up with the first book in the series:

http://curemito.org/estorke/4416 1) Episode Hints: Overall the audience reaction was very positive. In my opinion,the episode did a very good job of setting up the beginning of an epic adventure. A more detailed review will be posted after the premiere. For now here’s four details from the novel fans should look out for in the episode: ghosts, Jesus H. Roosevelt Christ, Gaelic, Battle wounds. Those who are new to Outlander should not be intimidated. The episode is framed in a way to also impart information for new viewers.

http://ortdestreffens.de/?yabloko=forex-oder-bin%C3%A4re-optionen&bc5=4c 2) Role Duplicity: Menzies noted although Frank and Black Jack are incredibly dissimilar, they have a key element in common: “Both are shaped by war”. Baife notes she doesn’t see  the Claire of the 1940’s and the Claire of 18th Century as separate entities. Many elements of her personality remain the same and they inform her time traveling experiences. Claire’s point of view is the audience’s view of a time far removed from modern experience.

http://ebbandflowdesigns.com/?ruioed=tchat-et-rencontre-en-ligne&34f=a7 3) Censorship & Exaggeration:  Moore assures fans that Starz isn’t meddling with the scripts. They’re not pushing for hyped up controversial material and they’re also not calling for cuts. Scenes of sex, violence, and medical gore are treated in the same fashion the book series handles these subjects.

http://freejobseeker.com/municipal-corporation-mohali-recruitment-2017-apply-for-29-posts/?share=linkedin 4)Scotland As A Character: The natural beauty in the Highlands is a prominent feature in the series. Historical accuracy goes hand in hand with the scenery. Researching 18th Century Scotland was a top priority for the producers and set designers.  Props such as woven baskets, weapons, and other materials were made by Scottish artisans. Heughan notes that the show is a celebration of a culture that is almost extinct.

source link 5) The Author’s View:  Speculation about the possibility of an Outlander series or movie has gone on for many years. Fans were worried about how much scripts would alter plot points or the tone of the original. Gabaldon acts as a consultant to the production.  She believes the show is translating the pages to the screen in an effective fashion. She had a “very visceral” reaction to an upcoming scene involving the tension between Jamie and Claire.

After viewing the first episode, I’m even more excited for the rest of the season. Outlander fans, let us know what you’re looking forward to!

TDHN Exclusive: Five Insights From The Outlander NYC Premiere

Monday night’s screening and Q&A hosted by the 92nd Y was a chance for fans on the East Coast to see what Starz has in store for Outlander. The official premiere is Saturday, August 9th at 9pm.

image

[From left to right: Leslie Yaizel (moderator), Tobias Menzies (Frank Randall/Jonathan “Black Jack” Randall), Sam Heughan (Jamie Fraser), Catriona Baife (Claire Randall), Diana Gabaldon (Outlander series author), Ronald D. Moore (Executive Producer)]

Here’s five insights from the discussion fans will appreciate. As a note, only minor spoilers are included in this article as a courtesy to first time viewers or those who are not caught up with the first book in the series:

http://feveda.com.ve/mefistofel/1919 1) Episode Hints: Overall the audience reaction was very positive. In my opinion,the episode did a very good job of setting up the beginning of an epic adventure. A more detailed review will be posted after the premiere. For now here’s four details from the novel fans should look out for in the episode: ghosts, Jesus H. Roosevelt Christ, Gaelic, Battle wounds. Those who are new to Outlander should not be intimidated. The episode is framed in a way to also impart information for new viewers.

http://armor-deck.net/edikpedik/3170 2) Role Duplicity: Menzies noted although Frank and Black Jack are incredibly dissimilar, they have a key element in common: “Both are shaped by war”. Baife notes she doesn’t see  the Claire of the 1940’s and the Claire of 18th Century as separate entities. Many elements of her personality remain the same and they inform her time traveling experiences. Claire’s point of view is the audience’s view of a time far removed from modern experience.

see url 3) Censorship & Exaggeration:  Moore assures fans that Starz isn’t meddling with the scripts. They’re not pushing for hyped up controversial material and they’re also not calling for cuts. Scenes of sex, violence, and medical gore are treated in the same fashion the book series handles these subjects.

http://big-balloon.nl/?option=com_jce&task=plugin&plugin=imgmanager&file=imgmanager&method=form&cid=20&6bc427c8a7981f4fe1f5ac65c1246b5f=cf6dd3cf1923c950586d0dd595c8e20b 4)Scotland As A Character: The natural beauty in the Highlands is a prominent feature in the series. Historical accuracy goes hand in hand with the scenery. Researching 18th Century Scotland was a top priority for the producers and set designers.  Props such as woven baskets, weapons, and other materials were made by Scottish artisans. Heughan notes that the show is a celebration of a culture that is almost extinct.

go to site 5) The Author’s View:  Speculation about the possibility of an Outlander series or movie has gone on for many years. Fans were worried about how much scripts would alter plot points or the tone of the original. Gabaldon acts as a consultant to the production.  She believes the show is translating the pages to the screen in an effective fashion. She had a “very visceral” reaction to an upcoming scene involving the tension between Jamie and Claire.

After viewing the first episode, I’m even more excited for the rest of the season. Outlander fans, let us know what you’re looking forward to!

Hey Now Daily 7/24: PBS vs. The Internet

Today is the launch of Hey Now Daily to make TDHN updates a little more routine. We will spotlight a new article or news item that makes us go Hey! These spotlights will add to our existing coverage or introduce new items. Along with this new feature, we’re also working a new exclusive event report that will be posted early next week!
Vox posted this article on the PBS schedule controversy as part of their coverage of the Television Critics Association press tour. This ties in perfectly to our previous coverage of the Downton Abbey Series 4 Premiere and Rebecca Eaton’s book signing. This is a more detailed explanation of why it is not in PBS’ best interest to cater to internet savvy fans who watch illegal copies of both shows on the UK release schedule. 
In my opinion, the solution to the scheduling controversy is already at PBS’ fingertips. Their social media campaign can easily expand to engage the fans who are likely to read Series 5 spoilers. News updates can easily include outlets for fan discussion, fan works, and other content.
Let us know what you think on this article as well as this new feature!

Hey Now Daily 7/24: PBS vs. The Internet

Today is the launch of Hey Now Daily to make TDHN updates a little more routine. We will spotlight a new article or news item that makes us go Hey! These spotlights will add to our existing coverage or introduce new items. Along with this new feature, we’re also working a new exclusive event report that will be posted early next week!
Vox posted this article on the PBS schedule controversy as part of their coverage of the Television Critics Association press tour. This ties in perfectly to our previous coverage of the Downton Abbey Series 4 Premiere and Rebecca Eaton’s book signing. This is a more detailed explanation of why it is not in PBS’ best interest to cater to internet savvy fans who watch illegal copies of both shows on the UK release schedule. 
In my opinion, the solution to the scheduling controversy is already at PBS’ fingertips. Their social media campaign can easily expand to engage the fans who are likely to read Series 5 spoilers. News updates can easily include outlets for fan discussion, fan works, and other content.
Let us know what you think on this article as well as this new feature!

Confessions Of A Twentysomething Middle Grade Reader

I confess that I am in my mid twenties and I am an avid reader of middle grade books. For those not in the know, middle grade is the industry term for books marketed to 9-12 year olds. Granted there are some middle grade books that overlap with YA, but the focus of this article are those books that for various reasons do not overlap.

image

A partial shelfie of my middle grade collection. Some are newer titles, others are some classics from middle school. I wholeheartedly recommend every book/series in this picture!

I started writing this article a few days before the controversial Slate editorial against adults reading YA. I was annoyed by how many times bookstore workers side-eyed my browsing in the kid’s section. Now it’s even more important that I put this out there.

This passion started when I was that age and hasn’t let up since. Although I wavered between business biographies, adult history, and fiction in middle school; I always returned to the books my classmates couldn’t get enough of. (Yes that was not a typo. I read Lou Gerstner’s Who Says Elephants Can’t Dance? in 7th grade with as much fervor as Harry Potter installments!) As I grew up, I still went back to the middle grade sections to reread my favorites and find new books to enjoy.

In broad terms, middle grade books appeal to me for many of the same reasons adults love YA. Last month, I started a marathon read marathon of everything Rick Riordan has wrote. Mythological adventures were a perfect antidote for a mind tired of processing complicated political science assigned readings. Reading is one of the best forms of escapism out there. Not only did I find a good story, there are many elements in his books that speak to much deeper themes beneath the surface. Middle grade is just as likely a venue for profound literary themes as YA or even adult books. Even though most characters are younger than me, there are personality traits, reactions to plot developments, and situations I can identify with.

Current trends in adult books are also pushing me to read outside of my target age group. Although readers in their twenties are hungry for books catering to them, the supply of “new adult” books isn’t keeping up with demand. Many are looking for novels about self discovery and similar themes and aren’t finding these stories in the adult section of the book store. Quite a few authors have been told by publishers to make their mid 20’s characters teenagers because there isn’t enough interest. Most of the current “new adult” books are romances and need more representation of other subjects.

YA is currently dominated by John Green and those inspired by him along with paranormal romance. John Green is quite good, but I definitely want to move beyond this trend. I have a strong interest in mystery and historical fiction, and usually I prefer it in conjunction with adventure. YA mysteries are often watered down by paranormal or romance elements. Speaking of romance, middle grade is my standby when I want a story with no romance elements at all. When it comes to stories of diversity and acceptance, I often find middle grade books written by diverse authors or featuring diverse characters much more satisfying than most YA selections. 

There’s good, bad, repeated tropes, and overhyped books in every genre. Completely rejecting one genre or age group is closing off your reading options in an unhealthy way. Readers should pick out what they enjoy. There is no grade at the end of reading for leisure. I hope these confessions help others to reject the elitism and criticism and embrace good stories no matter what age they’re marketed for.

[Note: TDHN is in semi hibernation as I attend Columbia Journalism School. Please keep a bookmark or leave on your follow list so when there’s a new post you can find it! Thanks for all of your support!]