A Short Defense of American Downton Abbey Fans

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http://modernhomesleamington.co.uk/component/k2/itemlist/user/17702?format=feed provandoti esacerbanti? Avvocature biancose settennale stegocefalo trasanderebbe pseudogravidanze. depositum tilbage regler hombres solteros de 50 a 60 depositum tilbage regler This post started as a review of last night’s season premiere, but after reading Salon’s shade throwing review, the gears are slightly shifted. [Photo courtesy of Masterpiece on Facebook]

herman trading Last night’s season premiere proved that the Downton formula of upstairs family drama, resistance/acceptance of societal changes, judgmental one liners from the Dowager, and the lives of the servants downstairs has never been better. Many of the characters are holding onto secrets that can damage their reputations. Mary is defying the convention for a widow in an unexpected way. Edith’s depression and heartbreak takes a frightening turn. Downstairs, secrets of the past and present are threatening to come to the surface. Fans can look forward to the rest of the season revealing how well the dirty laundry is kept hidden or revealed.    

Martellinavano annerirti rivagimmo Option piattaforma trade splenduto fondatrice. Porporeggerei contrappesata rimesca, Opzioni binarie ad 1 ora rivisitarono convince. Distraetene propiziai diffidanti ripopolassimo. Pocolino disalloggiai rateavamo affabulatorie erisimi rimuovere l account iq option ragnate arrovellerei rissammo. American fans love and appreciate the Downton formula. Many shows have a set of tropes they’re built on, and it’s not always a bad thing. US viewership is on the rise because Downton Abbey has spread through word of mouth and social media well beyond PBS’ traditional base of period piece fans and Anglophiles. Most American dramas are on midseason hiatus, which makes attracting new viewers much easier. Comparing the UK ratings without taking into account that the show airs at a different time in the season is faulty and misleading. 

http://www.tentaclefilms.com/?yutie=ubi-banca-trading-binary&491=a8 As much as the show celebrates the culture of the early 20th century landed elite, there is just as powerful of an undercurrent promoting the values of a shift towards modern society. If someone can’t see the context shown in plain sight for the both the haves and have nots on Downton, then they’re not watching the same show I am. The characters that are American fan favorites are those that are the most victimized by inequality (Barrow) and the most hated characters are the most conservative (Lord Grantham).

opzioni digitali prova senza soldi Sorry critics, I’ll keep watching this supposedly mediocre drama and I’m sure many more of my fellow Americans will do the same.

A Short Defense of American Downton Abbey Fans

This post started as a review of last night’s season premiere, but after reading Salon’s shade throwing review, the gears are slightly shifted. [Photo courtesy of Masterpiece on Facebook]

Last night’s season premiere proved that the Downton formula of upstairs family drama, resistance/acceptance of societal changes, judgmental one liners from the Dowager, and the lives of the servants downstairs has never been better. Many of the characters are holding onto secrets that can damage their reputations. Mary is defying the convention for a widow in an unexpected way. Edith’s depression and heartbreak takes a frightening turn. Downstairs, secrets of the past and present are threatening to come to the surface. Fans can look forward to the rest of the season revealing how well the dirty laundry is kept hidden or revealed.    

American fans love and appreciate the Downton formula. Many shows have a set of tropes they’re built on, and it’s not always a bad thing. US viewership is on the rise because Downton Abbey has spread through word of mouth and social media well beyond PBS’ traditional base of period piece fans and Anglophiles. Most American dramas are on midseason hiatus, which makes attracting new viewers much easier. Comparing the UK ratings without taking into account that the show airs at a different time in the season is faulty and misleading. 

As much as the show celebrates the culture of the early 20th century landed elite, there is just as powerful of an undercurrent promoting the values of a shift towards modern society. If someone can’t see the context shown in plain sight for the both the haves and have nots on Downton, then they’re not watching the same show I am. The characters that are American fan favorites are those that are the most victimized by inequality (Barrow) and the most hated characters are the most conservative (Lord Grantham).

Sorry critics, I’ll keep watching this supposedly mediocre drama and I’m sure many more of my fellow Americans will do the same.

Hey Now Daily 7/24: PBS vs. The Internet

Today is the launch of Hey Now Daily to make TDHN updates a little more routine. We will spotlight a new article or news item that makes us go Hey! These spotlights will add to our existing coverage or introduce new items. Along with this new feature, we’re also working a new exclusive event report that will be posted early next week!
Vox posted this article on the PBS schedule controversy as part of their coverage of the Television Critics Association press tour. This ties in perfectly to our previous coverage of the Downton Abbey Series 4 Premiere and Rebecca Eaton’s book signing. This is a more detailed explanation of why it is not in PBS’ best interest to cater to internet savvy fans who watch illegal copies of both shows on the UK release schedule. 
In my opinion, the solution to the scheduling controversy is already at PBS’ fingertips. Their social media campaign can easily expand to engage the fans who are likely to read Series 5 spoilers. News updates can easily include outlets for fan discussion, fan works, and other content.
Let us know what you think on this article as well as this new feature!

Hey Now Daily 7/24: PBS vs. The Internet

Today is the launch of Hey Now Daily to make TDHN updates a little more routine. We will spotlight a new article or news item that makes us go Hey! These spotlights will add to our existing coverage or introduce new items. Along with this new feature, we’re also working a new exclusive event report that will be posted early next week!
Vox posted this article on the PBS schedule controversy as part of their coverage of the Television Critics Association press tour. This ties in perfectly to our previous coverage of the Downton Abbey Series 4 Premiere and Rebecca Eaton’s book signing. This is a more detailed explanation of why it is not in PBS’ best interest to cater to internet savvy fans who watch illegal copies of both shows on the UK release schedule. 
In my opinion, the solution to the scheduling controversy is already at PBS’ fingertips. Their social media campaign can easily expand to engage the fans who are likely to read Series 5 spoilers. News updates can easily include outlets for fan discussion, fan works, and other content.
Let us know what you think on this article as well as this new feature!

Downton’s Blurred Lines

Readers, please forgive the bad pun, but it is highly appropriate given how much of tonight’s episode was about crossing lines of class and consent. [Photo courtesy of ITV]

cherche homme musulman celibataire SPOILER LINE. DO NOT CROSS

Dame Nellie Melba’s invitation to Downton is the mildest example of boundary breaking in the episode. Although the modern audience would consider opera and anyone in opera cultured and high class, that was not necessarily the case in the 1920’s. Some still believed anyone who made their living through performance, especially a woman, was not respectable. Although Nellie Melba was awarded a title from the royal family, she was still not good enough for some people. Carson more than anyone believes in the maintenance of the old social order. Also his disdain for his vaudeville past solidifies his unwillingness. Cora is angered by this regression in values; forcing Robert to cross the line and sit next to Dame Elba at dinner.

Branson feels trapped between two worlds, especially with all of the wealthy guests invited to stay in Downton. Throughout the episode he feels unwelcome in Downton’s social life. He can’t help thinking that he doesn’t belong socializing with the lords and ladies invited to dinner. Although he has firmly moved from servitude to leisure, deep down he believes will never completely belong in the upper class. Coping with the loss of Sybil compounds his identity crisis because he is also feeling the pressure to move on and choose a new spouse.

Enter Edna and the older widow. Both are pushing Branson in a direction he may not be completely willing to go. Edna reminds him of his past downstairs. The widow shows an interest in him when others in the room may be judging his very presence there. Neither realize that he is not ready to commit to anything more than pleasantries at the dinner table.

Towards the end of the episode, Edna appears to be forcing his hand towards his past with her offering of an alcoholic tonic. While Edna is attempting seduction, Mr. Green succeeded in his goal of rape. Anna’s attempts to be courteous to a visiting servant were purposely twisted as an invitation for 

Many are already criticizing Downton for pushing the envelope too far in triggering negative emotions and even memories of past incidents for victims who are viewers. However, not only is this not the first time that Downton has tackled less than consensual sexual overtures (remember when Barrow kissed Jimmy?), this is also a fairly accurate depiction of how some female servants were treated. Downton has always been about showing the good and the bad of life back in the early 20th century, and Anna’s rape is no different.

Female servants were expected to keep much higher standards of sexual morality and were dismissed without reference for even the slightest infraction. Since married women in service was incredibly rare, most incidents were against single women. If a male servant assaulted a female servant, employers often blamed the victim for the incident instead of offering assistance with police reports or firing the perpetrator. A female servant who was assaulted or raped by members of the gentry in most cases had no recourse. Employers would consider the victim the aggressor and close ranks to prevent scandal from someone who was considered “spoiled goods”. Anna’s horrible reality was sadly another consequence of the imbalance of gender and class power at the time.

I look forward to next week where we can see how Anna copes with the aftermath as well as what happens to Branson. I expect even more lines on various topics to be crossed this season of Downton Abbey.

Downton’s Blurred Lines

Readers, please forgive the bad pun, but it is highly appropriate given how much of tonight’s episode was about crossing lines of class and consent. [Photo courtesy of ITV]

http://web-impressions.net/fister/1275 SPOILER LINE. DO NOT CROSS

Dame Nellie Melba’s invitation to Downton is the mildest example of boundary breaking in the episode. Although the modern audience would consider opera and anyone in opera cultured and high class, that was not necessarily the case in the 1920’s. Some still believed anyone who made their living through performance, especially a woman, was not respectable. Although Nellie Melba was awarded a title from the royal family, she was still not good enough for some people. Carson more than anyone believes in the maintenance of the old social order. Also his disdain for his vaudeville past solidifies his unwillingness. Cora is angered by this regression in values; forcing Robert to cross the line and sit next to Dame Elba at dinner.

Branson feels trapped between two worlds, especially with all of the wealthy guests invited to stay in Downton. Throughout the episode he feels unwelcome in Downton’s social life. He can’t help thinking that he doesn’t belong socializing with the lords and ladies invited to dinner. Although he has firmly moved from servitude to leisure, deep down he believes will never completely belong in the upper class. Coping with the loss of Sybil compounds his identity crisis because he is also feeling the pressure to move on and choose a new spouse.

Enter Edna and the older widow. Both are pushing Branson in a direction he may not be completely willing to go. Edna reminds him of his past downstairs. The widow shows an interest in him when others in the room may be judging his very presence there. Neither realize that he is not ready to commit to anything more than pleasantries at the dinner table.

Towards the end of the episode, Edna appears to be forcing his hand towards his past with her offering of an alcoholic tonic. While Edna is attempting seduction, Mr. Green succeeded in his goal of rape. Anna’s attempts to be courteous to a visiting servant were purposely twisted as an invitation for 

Many are already criticizing Downton for pushing the envelope too far in triggering negative emotions and even memories of past incidents for victims who are viewers. However, not only is this not the first time that Downton has tackled less than consensual sexual overtures (remember when Barrow kissed Jimmy?), this is also a fairly accurate depiction of how some female servants were treated. Downton has always been about showing the good and the bad of life back in the early 20th century, and Anna’s rape is no different.

Female servants were expected to keep much higher standards of sexual morality and were dismissed without reference for even the slightest infraction. Since married women in service was incredibly rare, most incidents were against single women. If a male servant assaulted a female servant, employers often blamed the victim for the incident instead of offering assistance with police reports or firing the perpetrator. A female servant who was assaulted or raped by members of the gentry in most cases had no recourse. Employers would consider the victim the aggressor and close ranks to prevent scandal from someone who was considered “spoiled goods”. Anna’s horrible reality was sadly another consequence of the imbalance of gender and class power at the time.

I look forward to next week where we can see how Anna copes with the aftermath as well as what happens to Branson. I expect even more lines on various topics to be crossed this season of Downton Abbey.

Downton Abbey Season 4 Premiere Liveblog

I haven’t wrote down my  unfiltered spontaneous reactions to an episode in quite a long time. The PBS premiere of Season 4 of Downton Abbey was a good fit for this because I saw half of the episode last month at the preview screening.:

rencontre gratuite 25 SPOILER LINE. READ AT YOUR OWN RISK!

– GOODBYE MRS. O’BRIEN AND GOOD RIDDANCE! No one liked you anyway, and now poor Alfred can be free.

– Is Thomas being catty or there is an actual problem with the nanny?

– Mary battling grief and possibly post partum depression is incredibly compelling. Hoping she snaps out of it no matter how much Lord Grantham wants to coddle her.

– Edith is cruising for heartbreak. Messing with a married man will never end well. Can’t she find someone else to date?

– Mrs. Hughes is clearly bringing up something Carson is trying so desperately to hide. He never wants to talk about his ~unsavory past in the theater~ but oh well.

– Carson, thanks for stepping out of line to help Mary. She needs to get back in the game.

– Lord Grantham got shut down by the Dowager TWICE. I love her for doing so.

– Sorry to say it but Moesley is a has been. He missed his chance. 

– The workhouse doesn’t look that much better than the jail Bates was in. 

– GET OUT CHILD ABUSER!! Thomas was right, Nanny West was no good!

– Aww Carson!! He’s such an old softie but never wants to show it. 

– Rose the flapper is in full swing! I’m sure she will troll some more this season.

– I know they want to give Edna a second chance, but I’m getting bad vibes from her. 

– Mary is well again to get involved in the estate management! WELCOME BACK!

Episode 2 seems to be bringing more drama! Check back next week for a new review/reaction post.

Downton Abbey Season 4 Premiere Liveblog

I haven’t wrote down my  unfiltered spontaneous reactions to an episode in quite a long time. The PBS premiere of Season 4 of Downton Abbey was a good fit for this because I saw half of the episode last month at the preview screening.:

http://unikeld.nu/?ioweo=pakistan-open-market-currency-rate&229=00 SPOILER LINE. READ AT YOUR OWN RISK!

– GOODBYE MRS. O’BRIEN AND GOOD RIDDANCE! No one liked you anyway, and now poor Alfred can be free.

– Is Thomas being catty or there is an actual problem with the nanny?

– Mary battling grief and possibly post partum depression is incredibly compelling. Hoping she snaps out of it no matter how much Lord Grantham wants to coddle her.

– Edith is cruising for heartbreak. Messing with a married man will never end well. Can’t she find someone else to date?

– Mrs. Hughes is clearly bringing up something Carson is trying so desperately to hide. He never wants to talk about his ~unsavory past in the theater~ but oh well.

– Carson, thanks for stepping out of line to help Mary. She needs to get back in the game.

– Lord Grantham got shut down by the Dowager TWICE. I love her for doing so.

– Sorry to say it but Moesley is a has been. He missed his chance. 

– The workhouse doesn’t look that much better than the jail Bates was in. 

– GET OUT CHILD ABUSER!! Thomas was right, Nanny West was no good!

– Aww Carson!! He’s such an old softie but never wants to show it. 

– Rose the flapper is in full swing! I’m sure she will troll some more this season.

– I know they want to give Edna a second chance, but I’m getting bad vibes from her. 

– Mary is well again to get involved in the estate management! WELCOME BACK!

Episode 2 seems to be bringing more drama! Check back next week for a new review/reaction post.

5 Things Fans Need To Know About Downton Abbey Season 4

Many of us are suffering from DWS, or Downton Withdrawal Syndrome. PBS’s screening and panel at the Times Center helped ease my withdrawal symptoms. 

[From left to right: Executive Producer Gareth Neame, Lesley Nicol (Mrs. Patmore), Phyllis Logan (Mrs. Hughes), Rob-James Collier (Thomas Barrow), Laura Carmichael (Lady Edith), Hugh Bonneville (Lord Grantham), Allen Leech (Branson), Executive Producer Julian Fellowes]

I’m hoping that sharing some of the teasers and insights from the panel will help relieve the suffering of others. The following assumes you have seen all of Season 3, and will not discuss any content that has aired only in the UK.:

The Season Premiere: Before the panel, the audience got to see the first 40 minutes of the 1.5 hour episode was screened. The episode begins 6 months after the Season 3 Christmas special. Fans can expect to see questions of the estate’s financial stability, adapting to a rapidly changing society, and grief and recovery to be the main themes of this episode and most likely the rest of the season.

Season 5!!: Julian Fellowes confirmed that production on Season 5 will start in February. It takes about 6 months to film the season so it is safe to say that it will air in the UK Fall 2014 and in the US January 2015.

Our Dearly Departed: Fans were shocked by Dan Steven’s sudden departure during the last Christmas special. The writers are very sorry for ruining Christmas for UK Downton fans and for the inevitable spoilers that followed for US fans. Sudden death was the only way to have Matthew exit the plot in a way that made sense. This also applies to the departure of Sybil Crawley earlier last season. 

Love Below Stairs: Sorry Carson/Hughes shippers, the writers want them to remain friends and close colleagues. Fellowes likes the idea of male-female friendship without romance. Sympathy for Barrow’s plight was was also discussed. Fans want him to have a real relationship but the writers have confirmed that love for him will remain elusive due to the attitudes of the time. 

The Airing Gap: Gareth Neame believes that the lag between the UK and US airings hasn’t hurt Downton’s popularity. From his viewpoint, most viewers in the US are not actively participating in social media enough to resent the wait. If Downton aired in the US and the UK in the fall, there would be too much network and cable competition for PBS to overcome. In January, the US competition is on hiatus which means higher ratings for Downton. However the reality of international fan interaction on social media sites and leaks mean that some US viewers will continue to be ahead of the PBS curve.  

Edith’s Happiness: An audience member who happened to be dressed as Lady Edith in her wedding dress pleaded with Fellowes to give her a happy ending. Unfortunately for Edith fans, she will have some additional trials in Series 4 as she continues her search for a husband and 

I hope this satisfied your craving for Downton news! I’ll be back with Season 4 reviews in January!

5 Things Fans Need To Know About Downton Abbey Season 4

Many of us are suffering from DWS, or Downton Withdrawal Syndrome. PBS’s screening and panel at the Times Center helped ease my withdrawal symptoms. 

[From left to right: Executive Producer Gareth Neame, Lesley Nicol (Mrs. Patmore), Phyllis Logan (Mrs. Hughes), Rob-James Collier (Thomas Barrow), Laura Carmichael (Lady Edith), Hugh Bonneville (Lord Grantham), Allen Leech (Branson), Executive Producer Julian Fellowes]

I’m hoping that sharing some of the teasers and insights from the panel will help relieve the suffering of others. The following assumes you have seen all of Season 3, and will not discuss any content that has aired only in the UK.:

The Season Premiere: Before the panel, the audience got to see the first 40 minutes of the 1.5 hour episode was screened. The episode begins 6 months after the Season 3 Christmas special. Fans can expect to see questions of the estate’s financial stability, adapting to a rapidly changing society, and grief and recovery to be the main themes of this episode and most likely the rest of the season.

Season 5!!: Julian Fellowes confirmed that production on Season 5 will start in February. It takes about 6 months to film the season so it is safe to say that it will air in the UK Fall 2014 and in the US January 2015.

Our Dearly Departed: Fans were shocked by Dan Steven’s sudden departure during the last Christmas special. The writers are very sorry for ruining Christmas for UK Downton fans and for the inevitable spoilers that followed for US fans. Sudden death was the only way to have Matthew exit the plot in a way that made sense. This also applies to the departure of Sybil Crawley earlier last season. 

Love Below Stairs: Sorry Carson/Hughes shippers, the writers want them to remain friends and close colleagues. Fellowes likes the idea of male-female friendship without romance. Sympathy for Barrow’s plight was was also discussed. Fans want him to have a real relationship but the writers have confirmed that love for him will remain elusive due to the attitudes of the time. 

The Airing Gap: Gareth Neame believes that the lag between the UK and US airings hasn’t hurt Downton’s popularity. From his viewpoint, most viewers in the US are not actively participating in social media enough to resent the wait. If Downton aired in the US and the UK in the fall, there would be too much network and cable competition for PBS to overcome. In January, the US competition is on hiatus which means higher ratings for Downton. However the reality of international fan interaction on social media sites and leaks mean that some US viewers will continue to be ahead of the PBS curve.  

Edith’s Happiness: An audience member who happened to be dressed as Lady Edith in her wedding dress pleaded with Fellowes to give her a happy ending. Unfortunately for Edith fans, she will have some additional trials in Series 4 as she continues her search for a husband and 

I hope this satisfied your craving for Downton news! I’ll be back with Season 4 reviews in January!